The Cassidy, Cogan,
Shapell & Voegelin Philosophy

 

At Cassidy, Cogan, Shapell & Voegelin, L.C., we know that the prevailing view of the legal profession seems to emphasize the adversarial nature of our legal system, but we make every effort to practice law the old fashioned way — civilly, discreetly, and without fanfare — with our primary emphasis on resolving, not exacerbating, civil disputes.

Cassidy, Cogan, Shapell & Voegelin has traditionally refrained from the commercial advertising of services, and have relied for more than a century on the recommendations of the Wheeling and surrounding community for new business.

The firm is also a partner in education with the WALS Foundation, which strives through educational programming, publications, and business incubation to promote economic development on the state and local level consistent with its Jobs First Agenda.

More information on the WALS Foundation and its Jobs First Agenda may be accessed at walswheeling.com

Bookshelf Mural by artist Patricia Croft of Arts and Crofts.
Bookshelf Mural by artist Patricia Croft of Arts and Crofts.
A  detail from the  on-site ceramic sculpture  Wheeling’s Heroes by artist Jamie Lester.
A detail from the on-site ceramic sculpture Wheeling’s Heroes by artist Jamie Lester.
 

Our Inspiration

[The legal profession] should be one that places public interest above private gain, that puts the use of legal tools for progress and equality above the defense of the status quo, that treats legal services for the have-nots on par with those for the haves, that utilizes law as an instrument for helping the powerless and not for protecting the powerful, and above all that makes the law a vehicle for fighting social wrongs and not perpetuating them.
— Joseph L. Rauh

True, we build no bridges. We raise no towers. We construct no engines. We paint no pictures — unless as amateurs for our own principal amusement. There is little of all that we do which the eye of man can see. But we smooth out difficulties; we relieve stress; we correct mistakes; we take up other men’s burdens and by our efforts we make possible the peaceful life of men in a peaceful state.
— John W. Davis, 1 Record of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York 101, 102

I know fraud when I see it.
— Frank A. O’Brien Jr.

And lest we take ourselves too seriously with all that “inspiration,” we recall the wisdom of Martin S. Bogarad, who was fond of saying, Fifty years from now, none of this will make any difference.